Introduction to, “Just Like You,” by Nichole Troupe

Hello, this serves as an introductory post for Author Nichole Troupe, whose title, “Just Like You,” is being released in print November 2019. Nichole is a marvel. As a quadriplegic survivor, she is not only an aspiring children’s author, she is also a loving mother.

The title, “Just Like You,” is about a young girl named “Tina” who has been diagnosed with Autism. She attends public school and has subconscious concerns about socializing with other school children and how to communicate while remaining respected and appreciated.

Tina learns that she can make friends and relate to the people around her and they learn that having a disability does not shape the heart and mind of an individual.

It is a wonderfully illustrated book that encourages young children to seek out one another while understanding differences with empathy in order to build a better future in the short scope of day-to-day . . .

About the Author:
Even though Nichole was a happy kid, she had a hard life even from the very beginning. At three (3) months of age, Nichole was diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, which required a VP shunt placement so spinal fluid wouldn’t leak into her brain. As she grew, more surgeries were required. Nichole even had surgery one (1) surgery on her birthday.

At age sixteen (16), Nichole nearly died when a tube came undone permitting fluid to drain into her brain. Thank-fully, her team reacted well and saved her. If everyone hadn’t reacted appropriately – Nichole probably wouldn’t be alive today, but the emergency resulted in a shunt replacement surgery that thankfully, was a success.

At twenty-one (21) years of age, Nichole conceived a baby and subsequently lost her child to miscarriage. After-ward, she was unable to walk at a normal pace without stumbling. No one knew why. Two (2) years later, after trying to conceive another baby, Nichole was blessed with her little girl; however, once again her walking lessened, resulting in a requirement of a four-wheel walker with a seat.

Even though Nichole had help, it barely worked for her. After three (3) years of struggling with her four-wheel walker . . . Nichole’s leg gave out completely.

When that happened, doctors gave Nichole an MRI, which is a picture of the body inside and out and it showed she needed spinal surgery. This eventually resulted in her becoming a quadriplegic. When she the first surgery occur-red,  Nichole was able to use her upper body for a little more than one (1) year. Gradually, this changed, resulting in the need for a permanent wheelchair.

Eventually, Nichole required around-the-clock care, which became frustrating for her. Moving from independence to needing assistance with her hair, washing and brushing her teeth did not feel good for Nichole at age thirty-two (32).

To relieve stress, and thwart anxiety, like Tina in “Just Like You,” Nichole began writing. She moved from California to Washington State and found a suitable home to live in.

Nichole began seeing a counselor. She learned writing is the best way for her not to become angry about her physical limitations. Writing provides inspiration and an outlet to the world beyond disability and it is what she loves to do today.

After one of Nichole’s nurses bought her a device to talk into that writes everything she says, she put the gift to good use and developed, “Just Like You.”

Today, Nichole inspires children to learn more about people around them in a nonjudgmental manner while embracing and learning from their universal differences.

Currently, she is working on her second children’s book for release in 2020.

Nichole Troupe

Hello, this serves as an introductory post for Author Nichole Troupe, whose title, “Just Like You,” is being released in print November 2019. Nichole is a marvel. As a quadriplegic survivor, she is not only an aspiring children’s author, she is also a loving mother.

The title, “Just Like You,” is about a young girl named “Tina” who has been diagnosed with Autism. She attends public school and has subconscious concerns about socializing with other school children and how to communicate while remaining respected and appreciated.

Tina learns that she can make friends and relate to the people around her and they learn that having a disability does not shape the heart and mind of an individual.

It is a wonderfully illustrated book that encourages young children to seek out one another while understanding differences with empathy in order to build a better future in the short scope of day-to-day…

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