How to tailor your writing more to your audience

Writing is an exciting adventure. Transporting ideas from your head down to the paper through the consignment of your pen is a joy. Sometimes we could be drowned in floods of our creativity, forgetting about the person we are writing to – our audience. The reality is as much as your writing should be smeared with the aroma of your intellects, we can’t deny that our writing has an audience to feed. We must use the yearnings of our audience as ingredients when stewing up our writing to make it savory enough for your readers to consume.  Thus how do we tailor our writing to the dimensions of our audience?

You must consider the level of education of your audience

education

The first means is looking out for the level of education of your audience. You can’t be writing to a layman like you do to a white haired Harvard professor. To digest a piece of writing, your audience’s brains must be able to masticate the content. Thus don’t give them something that is not compatible with the OS (operating system) of their brains.

One way you can clearly have an idea of the educational altitude of your audience is checking out forums where the subject you are addressing have been earlier on discussed. Read through their languages and you can generally have a feel of the language that is agreeable with the academic status quo of your prospective audience. You can check out like four forums to get a complete blend of the level of education which will help you in molding your language more appropriately.

In the case where the writing is commercial and targeted towards spending, take a look at the spending statistics connected to the subject. An increased spending denotes a higher income level which could eventually translates into higher educational levels.

You should strive for a tone that the audience will be comfortable with

tone of audience.jpg

It would be a nice thing when your tone clearly matches that of your audience. You shouldn’t write top business writing say proposals in casual unprofessional tone. This kills the potency of the write-up as it could easily be deported to the garbage bin for not being serious. To show your relative level of acquaintance in the niche you are writing on, it would do well to bring in some industry terms. Chipping in industry terms doesn’t necessarily mean congesting your write up with the most technical jargons. Sprinkling a moderate handful of industry terms in your write-up suggest to the reader your relative level of expertise as a professional in what you are writing about.  One way to get a feel of the tone is simply checking out previously written works on the subject and see the tone deployed in writing it. There you have the path your tone should tread.

Your writing must add value to your audience Add value

Above your choice of language and tone is the value your writing must add to your audience. Your audience should be able to eat some nutritious information from your writing. Your writing must be of value. Try to expose the reader to new possibilities, refine him via the writing and eventually arm him with more knowledge at the end of the write-up. Don’t forget the ultimate reward of your write-up is the value it adds to the reader. That is where the factual gratification lies not even the stream of effort you poured into the writing.

In all we have been able to explore ways we can carry our audience along in our write up. We must remember that our writing must not be customized to our personal sentiments. Our write-ups must not be brewed to become a liquor of words only us can drink. It is said content is king, but content is king only when the audience is treated royally!

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